Tanner Flanagan

Professional Skier and Ski Guide

Hometown

Steamboat Springs, Colorado

Current

Jackson, Wyoming

Tanner grew up ski racing and learning the "art of the arc" in Colorado, but in his early 20’s, he found his passion in powder skiing and moved to Jackson Hole, Wyoming. His relentless pursuit of knowledge and ski touring in the mountains has lead to countless adventures all across the globe. Knowing how to best prepare for epic adventures, reacting to the constant changes in weather and conditions and developing knowledge and instincts to make informed decisions while in the backcountry is what Tanner is all about. If there’s snow to ski, you can find him adventuring with friends and leaving his signature on classic ski descents. Tanner is constantly bridging the gap between big mountain freerider and ski guide; he has the knowhow and can crank out some serious G force in his turns to boot.

How do you bridge the gap between being a professional ski guide and a professional freeskier?

Its all about acceptable risks. While guides will have a lower risk tolerance, some pro skiers may have a high risk tolerance. These of course come with the territory - but the tricky part is keeping everything balanced. Knowing when you can step up into bigger terrain can take years of practice and experience, and letting my knowledge and instincts pair with my skiing ability has let me achieve great things while ski mountaineering.

What are your three favorite memories from the mountains?

My favorite memory from the mountains is my first trip to Chamonix with my friend and photographer Fred Marmsater. He had been there before and had a “hit list” that was all time - including many famous lines. The week before we went, Cham received about 5 feet of snow and fortunately conditions were stable when we arrived. Needless to say we slayed it, nailing nearly every major line we attempted and checking some huge accomplishments off our list. After 2 weeks of skiing in Chamonix we both left sick and exhausted from never taking a break or a day off!

What does Let The Outside In mean to you?

I Let The Outside In by letting the inside out. Being in nature always has been like a form of meditation for me, everything I’ve been keeping inside me and bottling up has a chance to be processed and dealt with. It slows everything down and allows me to be present in the moment while not hanging on to moments past or thinking of future moments. I see it as not so much of an escape, but instead a chance to catch up.